Visiting Fellow Bill Lubenow

VISITING Fellow Bill Lubenow came to Wolfson on his first sabbatical in 1982 and explains that "things being as they often are, I was not funded until August that year. I wrote to David Williams quickly and he wrote back to say that he didn't know if there was a place but that I should come ahead and he would see what he could do. So I arrived in September and was put into Norton House even before I was admitted as a Visiting Scholar." He returned for the next few years during his winter recess from Richard Stockton College, New Jersey, and in 1987 returned in Lent Term as a Visiting Fellow. The Professor of History continues: "Annually have I returned, more recently perched in Fuchs House (known to its inmates as the Penguin Palace). Two things draw me, and I think many people, back to Wolfson: its academic and intellectual force, and comradeship."

"The research for my all my books, and some of the writing of each, have been done at Wolfson: Parliamentary Politics and the Home Rule Crisis (1988), The Cambridge Apostles (1998), and Liberal Intellectual and Public Culture (2010). I am currently working on a fifth, a book on the history of cognition and knowledge in the nineteenth century. Every one of their words owes a good deal to the stimulating discussion at Formal Hall, in the club room, in seminars, and individual contacts."

Personal contact of that sort suggests the importance of comradeship to Bill. No sooner had he turned up in Norton House the first time he met Spiros Flogaitis, a lawyer from Athens. No sooner had he turned up in Norton House the second time he met Donald Adamson who was then writing his book on Pascal. "Over the years friendships formed which have remained," he said. "People such as Richard Castle, Hugh and Mary Bevan, John Naughton, Gordon and Faith Johnson, Owen and Jo Edwards, Norma Emerton, Tom Kennedy to name a few. They and others from the Breakfast Club have added immensely to the intellectual pleasure of coming to Wolfson. I am pleased beyond measure to have had these intellectual and comradely experiences. E.M. Forster famously said, 'only connect'. It is true."

Visiting Fellow Bill Lubenow